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An individual, of no great importance, who is unable to the see the natural world as a place for competition, that was until Covid-19 intervened!. I catch fish, watch birds, derive immense pleasure from simply looking at butterflies, moths, bumble-bees, etc - without the need for rules! I am Dylan and this is my blog - if my opinions offend? Don't bother logging on again - simple!

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Wednesday, 3 August 2022

Med Gull mayhem

 I'd got a few bits which might be worthy of cobbling together in order to produce a blog post but, they wouldn't have amounted to much? An email from Ric up-dating me on his medical situation, all very positive, was catalyst to me grabbing the phone and having a chat with my brother, Sye. It was whilst stood out in the garden, 17.05 hrs, that I became aware of the huge numbers of Mediterranean Gulls moving overhead. There were hundreds, if not thousands, of birds involved. The vast majority appeared to be moulting adults, yet there were certainly a good number of 1st cy birds involved as well. Having completed my call, I grabbed the long lens and rattled off a few shots to record the event. All over within 10 minutes of me noticing it had started, I secured a few images which are worthy of sharing?



Yesterday had produced our first garden Willow Warbler, of the autumn, along with a few decent moths in the 125w MV.  I then headed off to the River Stour for my first Barbel session since June 30th! I caught a Bream, for my troubles, but learned so much more about the challenge I've set myself. 


I won't say too much because I have no intention of spoiling this project by alerting "angling parasites" to the possibilities I've discovered. All I will say is that a PB is on the cards and it might not be that Barbel I'd hoped for?

2 comments:

  1. Dyl, I'm almost ashamed to admit how few Med gulls I've ever seen. But I'll never forget the first one. One winter on a bowling green on the Southsea seafront.

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    1. Hi Ric, Med Gulls are a very familiar sight around the Kent coastline. They breed in good numbers along the Thames/Medway corridor and congregate in their thousands at Copt Point during the winter months. I'm fairly sure that my first one was "twitched" at an industrial estate in Rickmansworth, way back in the late 1980's ? I remember been impressed by the pure white wings. Lot's going on at the moment, but I will email you on Friday. All the best - Dyl

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