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An individual, of no great importance, who is unable to the see the natural world as a place for competition, that was until Covid-19 intervened!. I catch fish, watch birds, derive immense pleasure from simply looking at butterflies, moths, bumble-bees, etc - without the need for rules! I am Dylan and this is my blog - if my opinions offend? Don't bother logging on again - simple!

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Tuesday, 9 November 2021

New toys

 It was way back, in late 1993, when I first stumbled across the dark art that is moth trapping! It was at Sandwich Bay Bird Observatory, which is not SBBOT!. Back then it was still a hub of ornithological activity and not the money motivated, pitiful, excuse that it has now become. Andy Johnson, Paul. A.  Brown, Tim Bagworth and, the late, great, Tony Harman were central to the moth recording at the "Obs" during this era. In 1994, Benno needed a project for the school summer break. Because of the impact that the "hands on" moth trapping experience at SBBO  had exerted, we decided to build and run a moth trap in our tiny garden in the village of Ash, just outside of Sandwich. It was one of those pivotal moments? I have to admit that since the passing of my father, August 2016, that I've rather lost interest. I think Gavin Haig refers to it as "phasing" which is exactly what I feel has happened. However, just recently I've gotten hold of two 125w Robinson MV moth traps and am really looking forward to using them. Obviously November isn't the best time to embark upon such an adventure, so I'm happy to wait for Spring. The important thing is that I do have these items available. Retirement and unlimited time? What a combination. Just as I recognise that my bird call recognition has been been "dulled" by the lapse in involvement, so will discover how much my (macro) moth id skills have been impaired by the lay off? Surely it has to better that I look, and don't know, than not look at all?


2 comments:

  1. I'm sure you will enjoy the trapping Dyl, its a great thing to do in your garden to see the myriad of creatures that frequent your patch that you otherwise wouldnt be aware of. Good luck...

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    1. Cheers Stewart, I'm sure you're right as I now have so much more time to spend studying the finer id criteria of those pesky micros! - Dyl

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