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An individual, of no great importance, who is unable to the see the natural world as a place for competition. I catch fish, watch birds, derive immense pleasure from simply looking at butterflies, moths, bumble-bees, etc - without the need for rules! I am Dylan and this is my blog - if my opinions offend? Don't bother logging on again - simple!

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Monday, 5 December 2016

I should make more effort

Yesterday morning,  in glorious sunshine, I went out for a stroll. In itself, nothing too different from any other nice day spent in the outdoors but, I was at Grove Ferry! The first time I've set foot on this magnificent reserve in a couple of years. The place has many special memories for me and I have been extremely fortunate to have seen and found many fantastic birds within the boundaries of the Stodmarsh/Grove Ferry Reserve.


It was very pleasant, although I could have written a list of what I would see without leaving home, such is the predictable nature of this extensive reed-bed habitat. Snipe flushed from soggy fields, Marsh Harriers floated gracefully as they patrolled the skies, ever watchful. A Peregrine scythed through a huge flock of swirling Lapwings, away beyond the Grove Ferry Inn and a Stonechat flicked along Harrison's Drove, advancing as I approached. Bearded Tits were present, but very uncooperative when I pointed the long lens in their direction. Plenty of Fieldfare, Redwing and Blackbirds feeding on the profusion of Hawthorn berries around the place and star billing went to the party of six Bullfinches feeding quietly in the paddock along the entrance track. A cracking way to spend a couple of hours - I should do it more often.


Out in the garden, this morning, a stunning adult male Sparrowhawk spent a few moments perched on the aviary before flying off across the farm.  A flock of eleven Long-tailed Tits paraded along the boundary hedgerow, allowing a quick record image before continuing on their way. Off to work in a couple of hours but, hey-ho, soon be Christmas!


9 comments:

  1. Dyl, yesterday I settled for watching three Jack Snipe. Only later did I realise that I had just doubled the number I'd seen of this species ever!
    1986 Wraysbury GP, 1989 Rainham, 1991 Scilly.
    I really must make some effort at all.

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    1. Effort to go birding? When you're listing, in whatever capacity, there is no requirement for effort - you do it because you want to. It's only when it becomes a secondary interest that effort is required to get off your arse and take a look. One of my main reasons for using electronic bite indication is that it allows me the freedom to watch the other wildlife around the venues I fish. I happily accept that it is not the most sensitive method of angling - yet staring at a float would prevent so many other experiences that I'm unwilling to go down that route. So in this respect I am hedging my bets - I ain't always fishing the most efficient way, but I am not so intent on a single float to be unable to enjoy the rest of my surroundings - pays your money and makes your choice? - Dyl

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  2. Why do we care?? That's the bigger question

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    1. I don't think I ever asked for you to care. If you want to offer an opinion about my blogging, please have the decency to put your name to it - Jessica (Mrs Waite I presume?) - Have a nice day now

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  3. Dyl, yes of course, bite alarms. I too would relax with binoculars in hand, watching the world and wildlife instead of silent (and motionless) indicators. Then again, how about watching TV in a bivvy or playing games on a phone between fish activity?
    Me neither!

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  4. I own a bivvy - it sees one session a year; when we go Scotland and an overnighter a few weeks prior, just to ensure it remains serviceable. The modern carp scene with all it's fancy gizmos and toys leaves me in total bewilderment. The tackle carried by these guys is ridiculous - a rod for the marker float, another for the spod/spomb, with special reels suited to each task. Then there's the triplicated 3.5 lbs t/c rods and huge "Big Pit" reels for the actual fishing (on a two acre day-ticket carp puddle.)
    In Scotland our technology revolves around a gas powered freezer, which keeps our dead-bait in good shape, and a fancy builders radio, powered by a Makita battery, which we also use to keep our phones and camera batteries charged. The radio allows us to keep up with the football results during the hectic period towards the end of the season - we get a signal via some fancy app on Benno's I-phone. My own phone doesn't even have a camera facility!

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  5. My last bivvy was eaten by mice, and my phone is a permanently switched off £10 job.

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    1. If it's permanently switched off - why have it?

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  6. Permanently is the wrong description Dyl. I'm half awake. I do turn it on, but only when I need to make a call. Last occasion August.

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