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An individual, of no great importance, who is unable to the see the natural world as a place for competition. I catch fish, watch birds, derive immense pleasure from simply looking at butterflies, moths, bumble-bees, etc - without the need for rules! I am Dylan and this is my blog - if my opinions offend? Don't bother logging on again - simple!

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Wednesday, 9 May 2018

Green the new Gold?

I have altered the feeding station, very slightly, and have decided to feed with fat-balls and sunflower hearts only. The local House Sparrows and Starlings are perfectly OK with this strategy; the only birds which are directly affected are the feral Pigeons that were attracted to the spilled seed of my regular garden feeder mix. Coffee and camera to hand, I was enjoying the early morning sunshine, stood at the back door when I heard the unmistakable call of a Greenfinch - game on! I was on coffee number two when a pair of Goldfinches dropped down onto the feeding station allowing me my first photo opportunity of the morning. They stayed a few minutes, alternating between feeders and the bird bath, before heading off across the fields towards Broadstairs. Then it happened, a flashing yellow/green rump and there she was, a female Greenfinch on the feeders. Camera in overdrive, I clicked away merrily, in order to obtain a decent record of this momentous occurrence, the first garden record for over a year! How sad is that?



After she had departed, in much the same direction as the Goldfinches, I was looking at the images on the back of the camera when a Rose-ringed Parakeet dropped in. Absolutely glowing in the brilliant sunshine, I couldn't help myself. They might be invasive aliens, but they are sure impressive when seen close up.


6 comments:

  1. A sadder fact than yours re. the Greenfinch, despite living in rural Sheppey I'd be overjoyed at seeing any finch at my feeders. Also, the pigeons and doves seem to feed entirely on the sunflower hearts that get dropped by the sparrows from the feeders, so presumably yours will soon adjust to this new food. I don't provide fat balls because within minutes of putting them out, every Starling on Sheppey arrive from nowhere and strip them in no time..

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    1. Hi mate,

      So sorry for the delay in my reply. Feeding the birds is a very emotive subject, we all have our reasons and our favourites? I'm very happy that Starlings eat the fat balls, not too sure about Parakeets on the sunflowers? Feral Pigeons are a pain, yet tolerated, because Collared Doves and Wood Pigeons also benefit from the food source. It was all brought to a head by the recent visit to my youngest brother's house, in Aston Clinton, Bucks. There is a petition within the village to stop residents feeding the Red Kites? Dangerous territory, in my opinion, because next stop is Herring Gulls, Pigeons, Blue Tits and Sparrows. We are either allowed to feed wild birds, in our gardens, or not. There can be no picking and choosing as to which species are more worthy than others? - Dyl

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  2. Nigers get the finches in round here. Messy though

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    1. BB

      Niger seed is very specific in it's appeal; my garden feeding station is host to a very diverse range of species, House Sparrows being dominant. It will become clear, over the next few months, that change is well underway at Wrathall Mansions and the dawn of a new era is upon us. Feeding the garden birds is not a pastime which is up for discussion - thus the use of niger seed cannot be discounted in the future? In the mean time - it's sunflower hearts all the way - got that new motor yet? - Dyl

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    2. Im feeding mainly starlings and jackdaws at the moment it seems. And yes, I now have some wheels.

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    3. BB, Jackdaws are a regular sight around Newlands, but I have yet to have one drop down into the garden, although they do occasionally perch on the roof. Great news about the wheels - out with the rods again soon? I'll keep an eye on the blog for a progress report. - Dyl

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